Copywriting 2018-01-31T18:42:07-05:00

Copywriting

How We Refer to Ourselves

Our Legal Name

Our legal name is Flyp Technologies Inc. and should only be used in legal documents. An acceptable variation uses the acronym DBA (doing business as) to clarify the relationship between our legal name and our business name; e.g., Flyp Technologies Inc. DBA Uberflip Inc.

Our Business Name

Obviously, it’s Uberflip! With the exclusion of legal documents, the name Uberflip is used for all branded and corporate communications. Excluding its use in our logo and wordmark, the ‘U’ in Uberflip is always capitalized and does not include the umlaut (two dots placed over the ‘u’ to change its sound).

Our Writing and Editorial Style

AP Style is the predominant style for most forms of public facing corporate communications in the United States. In keeping with using conventions for our American audience, for writing and grammar, we also adhere to American Press Style and the AP Stylebook, with some modifications specific to Uberflip. Below are some common style conventions we follow. For questions on AP Style use, contact the content marketers on the marketing team.

Spelling

Uberflip’s communications, content, and collateral cater to a predominantly American audience, so we adopt American spellings accordingly, while remaining proud of our Canadian roots. Our authoritative source for American spellings is Webster’s New World College Dictionary.

Capitalization

What Not to Capitalize in Titles

Don’t capitalize articles, prepositions or conjunctions that have fewer than four letters. Focus on how the word functions in the title to determine if it should be capitalized. Here is a short list of common lowercase words in titles:

a, an, and, at, but, by, for, in, nor, of, on, or, so, the, to, up, yet

Titles, Headlines, and Headings

For the titles, headlines, and headings of blogs, articles, ebooks, infographics, videos, reports, events, etc., use the following capitalization rules:

  • Generally, capitalize the first word, the last word, and all the important words.
  • Also capitalize prepositions, pronouns, verbs, and conjunctions that are more than 3 letters long. E.g., When Frequent Content Generation Gets You Less
  • Capitalize an article—the, a, an—or words of fewer than four letters if it is the first or last word in the title, headline, or heading. E.g., How We Do It
  • The first word after colon is always uppercase in titles, headlines, and headings. E.g., Uberflip Presents: The Content Experience

For automatic capitalization using AP Style, use this tool here.

Calls-to-Action (CTAs)

For capitalization of CTAs, use the same rules above for titles, headlines, and headings in both the CTA copy and the CTA button copy.

Content Hub Menus and Custom Labels

For Content Hub menus and custom labels, use the same rules above for titles, headlines, and headings.

Common Nouns

In general, avoid unnecessary capitals. Use lowercase common nouns when they stand alone in subsequent references: the party, the river, the street. Lowercase the common noun elements of names in plural uses: the Democratic and Republican parties, Main and State streets, lakes Erie and Ontario. Exception: plurals of formal titles with full names are capitalized: Presidents Jimmy Carter and Gerald R. Ford.

Proper Nouns

Capitalize all proper names, the names of departments and agencies of national and provincial governments, trade names, names of associations, companies, clubs, religions, languages, races, places, and addresses. Otherwise, lowercase is favored where a reasonable option exists.

Job Titles

Capitalize formal job titles immediately before or after a name; e.g., Randy Frisch, President and CMO. Lowercase and spell out titles when they are not used with an individual’s name.

Departments

Capitalize formal organizational departments immediately before or after the company’s name; e.g., Uberflip’s Marketing Department. Lowercase and spell out titles when they are not used with a company’s name; e.g., sales team.

Punctuation and Symbols

commercial at (@)

With the exception of e-mail addresses and social media handles, spell out the word at. Do not use the symbol @ as a substitute for at.

ampersand

Use the ampersand when it is part of a company’s formal name or composition title: House & Garden, Procter & Gamble, Wheeling & Lake Erie Railway. The ampersand should not otherwise be used in place of and, except for some accepted abbreviations: B&B, R&B.

comma

Use commas to separate elements in a series. Include a final comma (i.e., oxford comma) after the penultimate item in a list of three or more items; e.g., an Italian painter, sculptor, and architect.

em dash (—)

The em dash is distinct from the hyphen and is denoted as an elongated horizontal line. Where possible, we use the proper em dash and avoid using double en dashes as a substitute (–). Do not uses spaces between words when using an em dash. Use the em dash to join independent clauses; e.g., Half of all advertising is wasted—but no one knows which half.

Also use pairs of em dashes with interrupters, which are phrases that add detail, emphasis, transition, or commentary; e.g., The best content experience platform—and the very first software of its kind—is Uberflip.

hyphen (-)

Hyphens are joiners. Use them to avoid ambiguity or to form a single idea from two or more words. The fewer hyphens the better; use them only when not using them causes confusion. (Small-business owner, but health care center.)

Use hyphens:

  • To avoid ambiguity: Use a hyphen whenever ambiguity would result if it were omitted: The president will speak to small-business owners. Others: He recovered his health. He re-covered the leaky roof. The story is a re-creation. The park is for recreation.
  • As compound modifiers: When a compound modifier—two or more words that express a single concept—precedes a noun, use hyphens to link all the words in the compound except the adverb very and all adverbs that end in -ly: a first-quarter touchdown, a bluish-green dress, a full-time job, a well-known man, a better-qualified woman, a know-it-all attitude, a very good time, an easily remembered rule.

plus (+)

Use the ‘+’ when it is part of a company’s formal name or composition title. The ‘+’ should not otherwise be used in place of ‘and’ or ‘more than.’

quotations (“”)

Surround the exact words of a speaker or writer with quotation marks when they are being quoted.

–The period and the comma always go within the quotation marks.

–The dash, the semicolon, the question mark and the exclamation point go within the quotation marks when they apply to the quoted matter only.

E.g., “I have no intention of staying,” he replied.
“I do not object,” he said, “to the tenor of the report.”
Franklin said, “A penny saved is a penny earned.”

slash (/)

Acceptable in descriptive phrases such as 24/7 or 9/11, but otherwise confine its use to special situations, as with fractions or denoting the ends of a line in quoted poetry. Where possible, phrase a clause without a slash; e.g., We want people to stand or wait in line. In the instance where a slash is used, include spaces before and after the slash; e.g., and / or.

Numbers, Dates, and Time

a.m., p.m.

Lowercase, with periods. Avoid the redundant 10 a.m. this morning.

dates

Always use Arabic figures, without st, nd, rd or th (i.e., avoid Jan. 1st, Feb. 2nd, Aug. 3rd, Sept. 4th).

When listing dates spanning multiple days, write out the dates without spaces around the hyphen; e.g., April 24-28

months

Capitalize the names of months in all uses. When a month is used with a specific date, abbreviate only Jan., Feb., Aug., Sept., Oct., Nov. and Dec. Spell out when using alone, or with a year alone. When a phrase lists only a month and a year, do not separate the year with commas. When a phrase refers to a month, day and year, set off the year with commas. In tables and charts, use these three-letter forms without a period: Jan, Feb, Mar, Apr, May, Jun, Jul, Aug, Sep, Oct, Nov, Dec.

numbers

In general, spell out one through nine; e.g., The Yankees finished second. He had nine months to go.

Use figures for 10 or above and whenever preceding a unit of measure or referring to ages of people, animals, events or things.

Use figures for all tables and graphs, and in statistical and sequential forms.

Use a comma to denote thousands; e.g., 1,000.

Formatting for Our Hub

Content and Collateral

  • For the titles of blogs, articles, ebooks, infographics and other content published to our hub, use H1.
  • For in-body headings, use H2, H3, H4, etc.
  • For body copy, use normal paragraph formatting.
  • For in-body text links, use Rubine Red if not already applied by CSS.
  • For more information, see the Typography section of this style guide.

CTAs

  • When writing copy for CTAs, see the capitalization section for this style guide.
  • Do not close CTA copy with a period.
  • Avoid punctuation in CTA button copy, such as exclamation points, periods, commas, etc.

Common Words and Acronyms

  • AI (artificial intelligence)
  • API (application programming interface)
  • app (application)
  • BOFU
  • bottom-of-funnel
  • calls-to-action (lowercase when referenced as a marketing term, outside of our platform)
  • CEP (content experience platform)
  • ebook
  • e-commerce
  • email
  • e-reader
  • home page (two words)
  • internet (lowercase ‘i’)
  • IT (information technology)
  • martech (marketing technology)
  • login (used as noun / adj)
  • log in (used as verb)
  • MAP (marketing automation platform)
  • MOFU
  • middle-of-funnel
  • omnichannel
  • on-demand (hyphenated; e.g., streaming services)
  • one-on-one (spell out; not 1:1, or 1-to-1, unless expressing mathematical ratios)
  • percent (one word)
  • SaaS (software as as service)
  • thought leader
  • TOFU
  • top-of-funnel
  • touchpoint
  • U.S. (in headlines, use US with no periods.)
  • web, webpage, website
  • white paper (two words)

Common Words and Acronyms

  • AI (artificial intelligence)
  • API (application programming interface)
  • app (application)
  • BOFU
  • bottom-of-funnel
  • calls-to-action (lowercase when referenced as a marketing term, outside of our platform)
  • CEP (content experience platform)
  • ebook
  • e-commerce
  • email
  • e-reader
  • home page (two words)
  • internet (lowercase ‘i’)
  • IT (information technology)
  • martech (marketing technology)
  • login (used as noun / adj)
  • log in (used as verb)
  • MAP (marketing automation platform)
  • MOFU
  • middle-of-funnel
  • Omnichannel
  • on-demand (hyphenated; e.g., streaming services )
  • one-on-one (spell out; not 1:1, or 1-to-1, unless expressing mathematical ratios)
  • percent (one word)
  • SaaS (software as as service)
  • thought leader
  • TOFU
  • top-of-funnel
  • touchpoint
  • U.S. (in headlines, use US with no periods.)
  • web
  • white paper (two words)

Glossary

Calls-to-Action (CTAs)

Calls-to-Action, or CTAs, are used to draw a visitor’s attention to an action you want to complete, like download a white paper, register for a webinar, or subscribe to a newsletter. CTAs can be text-based or more visual. Uberflip has built two types of CTAs for easy creation: Form CTAs and Link CTAs.

Content Score

The Content Score is an at-a-glance look at how content in the Hub is performing. The Content Score takes into account page views, landing visits, CTA click-throughs, leads generated, and assists.

Marketing Streams

Marketing Streams pull in (or ingest) content from pre-determined sources like YouTube, Flipbook folders, social channels, or others. Content streams cannot be altered to pull in more than one type of content.

Flipbook

A Flipbook is an interactive upload of a PDF. Flipbooks can be edited to add rich media, like videos and social embeds, as well as the addition of navigation features and other links.

Form CTA

A form CTA collects information from visitors and sends it to a marketing automation tool or email provider. Form CTAs can be used to gate content or can be set to be closed out of for non-mandatory collections (like newsletter subscribers).

Hub and Content Hub

A hub is the place where all content is collected and presented to viewers. When used in relation to the Uberflip platform and this specific function, use the proper name and capitalize it; e.g., Content Hub. For informal use, use hub in lowercase, except at the beginning of a sentence.

Items

An item is any piece within a hub, be it a Flipbook, blog post, video, or any other type of content.

Knowledge Base

A knowledge base is typically a collection of informative or product-related items. Many support teams create knowledge bases full of how-tos and FAQs. In general, knowledge bases do not include marketing materials.

Link CTA

A link CTA can send visitors to any URL, be it within the hub or on a different domain. Link CTAs do not collect information and are used solely for the direction of traffic.

Overlay CTA

Marketing streams pull content from various streams to create a customized page. Marketing streams may be made for various reasons, popular examples being topic- or persona-related.

Sales Stream

Sales Streams are collections of content optimized for reaching out to prospects and leads. Sales reps can compile any selection of content they want into a Sales Stream and add a personalized message to the stream.

Show / Hide

Hub users have the option to show or hide an item. This does not translate into publishing and unpublishing. An item that is hidden is still live, but cannot be seen unless the viewer has the direct link.

Tiles

A tile is the rectangular item in your hub that links to a piece of content.

Flipbook

A Flipbook is an interactive upload of a PDF. Flipbooks can be edited to add rich media, like videos and social embeds, as well as the addition of navigation features and other links.

Can’t find what what you’re looking for? Send a creative request to Uberflip’s brand team.

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